Huddersfield Rebrand | Logo Variations

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I decided to focus on four on my logo designs to take digitally so I can spend more time developing them. Therefore I chose the designs I felt had more potential. For each of my digital designs I had tried to incorporate the equality symbol as I strongly want it to be included to represent the change in society from 1920’s/1930’s to present day. This particular logo takes on more of a café visual with the items such as a bottle, glass, tea cup etc being included. I created variations playing with the type and the imagery but felt as though the logo was lacking.

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When doing my sketches, the designs with the illustration of the two men and woman were quite popular with my peers. I too liked the designs; however wondered if they were best for the logo, or something I could do in addition for the brand e.g. imagery used on publications.  When deciding on a concept for the brand I could visualise how I wanted the illustration to look and am not sure if including it within the logo would restrict it. In my variations I experimented with type and layout, my preferred versions were the first two as they look cleaner and less busy.

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In the project I have found the Cubism research particularly interesting. Even though I want to include an art deco theme, that doesn’t mean that I could not explore styles of cubism. In addition to this, there has been lots of art deco design influenced by Cubism, such as Cassandre.  Therefore this logo design includes a cubist geometric style within the type, as well as having a subtle art deco influence. To progress, the type would be coloured so that the shapes alternate colour shades. My only issue with this design is that the equality symbol struggles to compliment.

 

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The last design also uses cubist influence, applying the same geometric mosaic style but to the rectangular shapes forming the equality sign. This design really works in favour of the equality sign, but unfortunately not so well with the calligraphic handwritten type used previously. I was generally quite happy with the layout, therefore only needed to experiment with the type faces. The bottom two designs are my preferred from the variations. My only worry is that the design would not show enough art deco influence.

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